Home

Faithful. Focused. For You.

The Lutheran Schools Partnership represents more than 4,000 students enrolled in 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School in Fort Wayne. With so many options available, you’re sure to find the right fit for your child!

Lutheran schools are Christ-centered, nationally accredited, and follow Indiana state standards. Private tuition assistance, SGO grants, and Indiana Choice Scholarships are available to help make the Lutheran schools affordable.

Our commitment to education runs deep. Lutherans founded the very first school in northeast Indiana in 1837, and it still serves students today. Come discover why Hoosier parents have been choosing Lutheran schools for more than 175 years!

 
Best Practices
Mark Muehl | May 22, 2017
Providing The Seed & Water of Faith part I
Our schools have changed. Old assumptions about Lutheran schools can’t be assumed any longer. Financial and philosophical support of a church towards its school is not a given. Some seasoned Lutheran teachers don’t share enthusiasm for the call of teacher, even discouraging students and their own family from going into professional church work. Schools have changed in culture, in expectations, in clientele. Schools are expected to be self-sufficient which carries a different expectation for administrators and boards. Our culture has changed to follow the impact of progressive thought. Standards (and I’m not talking academic standards) are whatever is followed by the majority....and sometimes it’s hard to define the standards! Lutheran schools remain a rich treasure for the church, for local communities and for the individuals impacted by them. Lutheran schools hold opportunities to share Jesus uniquely and effectively. One important way in which church and school ministry need to consistently and be better bound to focused efforts are the opportunities for teachers and pastors to work together to evangelize and disciple students and their families. The days are gone when everyone knew each other and assumptions about parents, colleagues, the church and other constituents were on the same page. Today fiercely independent theologies, philosophies and cultures conflict with community...and community is a key part of the blessings of Lutheran schools. So consider that teachers are sharing the Gospel every day. They have unique opportunities to share Christ from morning through the afternoon and throughout the curriculum.  These opportunities grow out of science lessons, from correction of careless actions and words and from an implementation of a rule or procedure. Oh yes, and there are devotions, prayer and catechesis too! Consider also that school mission statements  include some reference or implication of the Great Commission. Doesn’t it make it essential that Lutheran schools exist for much more than academics? If not, we’re just a public school. So how can we all work better together to provide the “seed and water” of faith so that God’s will be done in our students and schools? We’re intentional with lesson plans, with schedules and with so much more. How about a sort of “RTI process” for faith formation and for guarding what we teach and confess? Lutheran schools are challenging places to operate. They cease to exist if their academic product is not strong. We owe our families the best of practices so their children can be productive citizens. But Lutheran schools also need not exist if we don’t intentionally, and effectively share Christ. In my next article, I’ll share a picture for organizing staff meetings and staff relationships around this all important mission of our schools.
 
Quality Education
Mark Muehl | May 22, 2017
Providing The Seed & Water of Faith part I
Our schools have changed. Old assumptions about Lutheran schools can’t be assumed any longer. Financial and philosophical support of a church towards its school is not a given. Some seasoned Lutheran teachers don’t share enthusiasm for the call of teacher, even discouraging students and their own family from going into professional church work. Schools have changed in culture, in expectations, in clientele. Schools are expected to be self-sufficient which carries a different expectation for administrators and boards. Our culture has changed to follow the impact of progressive thought. Standards (and I’m not talking academic standards) are whatever is followed by the majority....and sometimes it’s hard to define the standards! Lutheran schools remain a rich treasure for the church, for local communities and for the individuals impacted by them. Lutheran schools hold opportunities to share Jesus uniquely and effectively. One important way in which church and school ministry need to consistently and be better bound to focused efforts are the opportunities for teachers and pastors to work together to evangelize and disciple students and their families. The days are gone when everyone knew each other and assumptions about parents, colleagues, the church and other constituents were on the same page. Today fiercely independent theologies, philosophies and cultures conflict with community...and community is a key part of the blessings of Lutheran schools. So consider that teachers are sharing the Gospel every day. They have unique opportunities to share Christ from morning through the afternoon and throughout the curriculum.  These opportunities grow out of science lessons, from correction of careless actions and words and from an implementation of a rule or procedure. Oh yes, and there are devotions, prayer and catechesis too! Consider also that school mission statements  include some reference or implication of the Great Commission. Doesn’t it make it essential that Lutheran schools exist for much more than academics? If not, we’re just a public school. So how can we all work better together to provide the “seed and water” of faith so that God’s will be done in our students and schools? We’re intentional with lesson plans, with schedules and with so much more. How about a sort of “RTI process” for faith formation and for guarding what we teach and confess? Lutheran schools are challenging places to operate. They cease to exist if their academic product is not strong. We owe our families the best of practices so their children can be productive citizens. But Lutheran schools also need not exist if we don’t intentionally, and effectively share Christ. In my next article, I’ll share a picture for organizing staff meetings and staff relationships around this all important mission of our schools.
 
Christian Leadership
Mark Muehl | May 22, 2017
Providing The Seed & Water of Faith part I
Our schools have changed. Old assumptions about Lutheran schools can’t be assumed any longer. Financial and philosophical support of a church towards its school is not a given. Some seasoned Lutheran teachers don’t share enthusiasm for the call of teacher, even discouraging students and their own family from going into professional church work. Schools have changed in culture, in expectations, in clientele. Schools are expected to be self-sufficient which carries a different expectation for administrators and boards. Our culture has changed to follow the impact of progressive thought. Standards (and I’m not talking academic standards) are whatever is followed by the majority....and sometimes it’s hard to define the standards! Lutheran schools remain a rich treasure for the church, for local communities and for the individuals impacted by them. Lutheran schools hold opportunities to share Jesus uniquely and effectively. One important way in which church and school ministry need to consistently and be better bound to focused efforts are the opportunities for teachers and pastors to work together to evangelize and disciple students and their families. The days are gone when everyone knew each other and assumptions about parents, colleagues, the church and other constituents were on the same page. Today fiercely independent theologies, philosophies and cultures conflict with community...and community is a key part of the blessings of Lutheran schools. So consider that teachers are sharing the Gospel every day. They have unique opportunities to share Christ from morning through the afternoon and throughout the curriculum.  These opportunities grow out of science lessons, from correction of careless actions and words and from an implementation of a rule or procedure. Oh yes, and there are devotions, prayer and catechesis too! Consider also that school mission statements  include some reference or implication of the Great Commission. Doesn’t it make it essential that Lutheran schools exist for much more than academics? If not, we’re just a public school. So how can we all work better together to provide the “seed and water” of faith so that God’s will be done in our students and schools? We’re intentional with lesson plans, with schedules and with so much more. How about a sort of “RTI process” for faith formation and for guarding what we teach and confess? Lutheran schools are challenging places to operate. They cease to exist if their academic product is not strong. We owe our families the best of practices so their children can be productive citizens. But Lutheran schools also need not exist if we don’t intentionally, and effectively share Christ. In my next article, I’ll share a picture for organizing staff meetings and staff relationships around this all important mission of our schools.
 
Funding the Mission
Mark Muehl | May 15, 2017
Learn & Lead Series 2017
 
School Choice
Mark Muehl | March 20, 2017
Level the Playing Field by Protecting School Choice
Years ago, students from low-income families didn’t have much of a choice when it came to education. Some were stuck in poor-performing schools and unable to move to a better district. Non-public schools were out of the question, assumed only to be available to the affluent. Indiana’s Choice Scholarships ushered in a new era—one where all families, regardless of economic status, could choose the school they wanted, not the one they were forced into by circumstances. Opponents of school choice would have us overlook those needy families. They claim that expansions to Indiana’s choice scholarship have made it an “entitlement program for the wealthy.” However, data from the Department of Education simply doesn’t support their claim. The families benefiting most from the maximum Choice Scholarships are those who have the greatest need. Almost 69 percent of students who received the Choice Scholarship came from families whose annual income qualified them for the federal free or reduced lunch program. These are the students who received the maximum voucher amount—90 percent of the local public school’s per-student cost—and they are the clear majority of students who received vouchers. The remaining 31 percent are those who received a 50 percent scholarship. These are middle-income families whose annual income was equal to or less than 150 percent free or reduced lunch eligibility. When school-choice opponents say choice scholarship (vouchers) only benefit the elite, they are clearly ignoring the data. They also forget that the wealthy can already afford any school of their choice. Affluence gives them a freedom that low-income families did not have before choice scholarships. When Indiana voters gave low-income families the power of school choice, it leveled the playing field. It empowered all Hoosier families—regardless of wealth or ZIP code—an opportunity to choose the school that best fit their child’s needs. School choice should not just be for a privileged few. Indiana’s Choice Scholarship Program gives all Hoosier families the freedom to direct the education of their children, and that’s precisely how it should be.
 
SGO
Jon Dize | December 19, 2016
SGO Credits are Gone!
I hate to be the Scrooge-bearer of bad news, but the SGO credits are gone. Finished. We are out of coal for Bob Cratchit's office. For those wanting to support scholarships and receive the 50% state tax credit, you will have to wait until July 1, 2017 to make your gift. What does this mean? The Bah Humbugs: We received a number of donations late Friday, Saturday, and even Sunday (online credit/debit gifts). Since the Indiana Department of Revenue accepts SGO credit requests on a “first-come, first-get” basis, when they opened their emails this morning, they started down the list and many of these last-minute donations were too late. We will return checks and refund credit/debit card payments to these donors, strongly encouraging them to make their gift again in July. Per DOR rules, we cannot accept a gift and then hold the gift until July 1. (We hate returning gifts as much as Ebenezzer hated giving to charity.) If you have an autopay that sends us donations every month, you will need to suspend those payments until July 1. What is next? The Ghost of Christmas Futures: The Lutheran SGO of Indiana staff will continue to process non-credit gifts (matching gifts and gifts from donors not wanting the credit.) We still have two scholarship application due dates of January 15 and March 15. The 2016-17 fiscal year will be the 5th year of operations for our SGO, and we plan a few announcements to celebrate this milestone. We will be working with our School Choice partners to raise the credit amounts next and year and into the future, and may need your help convincing State House Scrooge's to free more credits for more scholarships; the more we raise, the more families we can help! We will still be available for questions (and answers!), donor presentations, etc. so keep calling and emailing. On the bright side, by going through $9.5 million in SGO credits, donors in Indiana have supported scholarships for families to attend non-public schools to the tune of $19 million. WOW. And, most of our schools raised the same or more than they did last year in less time than last year. We are therefore proud of our schools’ efforts to “get the word out” and start their fundraising efforts as early as the did. On behalf of the board of The Lutheran SGO of Indiana, Lynn, Jenny, and myself, we wish you a very merry Christmas and a happy, happy New Year. God bless us, every one!
 
News and Events
Mark Muehl | May 15, 2017
Learn & Lead Series 2017
Emmaus
Emmanuel St. Michaels
Zion School Logo