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The Lutheran Schools Partnership represents more than 4,000 students enrolled in 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School in Fort Wayne. With so many options available, you’re sure to find the right fit for your child!

Lutheran schools are Christ-centered, nationally accredited, and follow Indiana state standards. Private tuition assistance, SGO grants, and Indiana Choice Scholarships are available to help make the Lutheran schools affordable.

Our commitment to education runs deep. Lutherans founded the very first school in northeast Indiana in 1837, and it still serves students today. Come discover why Hoosier parents have been choosing Lutheran schools for more than 175 years!

 
Best Practices
Mark Muehl | June 11, 2017
Church Work & Elijah: God's Prescription for R&R (part II)
This article is part 2 of a 2-part series. For part 1, click HERE Remember Elijah and the exhaustion he was experiencing? It’s something we all experience. How about considering God’s prescription for Elijah’s R&R...and think about it for you as summer has arrived. #1- The whisper of God. Elijah may have wanted a light show and a powerful emotional experience. Instead, God showed himself in a simple whisper, and the prophet was back to listening and talking with God. God still whispers today. Our culture demands a worship experience of high emotion and impactful messaging. But let’s get to the basics of how God  speaks to us- His written Word, His gifts of Baptism and His Supper. Those whispers remind us of the repentant life we need and how God feeds that life with his very self. Does your summer include reading a good book? How about a book of the Bible? Psalms? A Gospel? Let God’s whisper ring in your ear. And make sure worship is a priority for your R&R. God’s service to us is essential for daily life, let alone for monumental healing. #2- Look and listen for seeing all that God has put in our lives to fulfill His will. It’s not about our will being pursued and being accomplished. It’s about God’s will and His accomplishments. Go to him in prayer and get out of His way. See the opportunities He has placed in your life to fulfill your call to your church and school. Paul also reminds us to not be concerned about product- God takes care of that. “What then is Apollos? What is Paul? Servants through whom you believed, as the Lord assigned to each.” (1 Corinthian 3:5). As you get away a bit this summer, consider the parents, the colleagues and other partners in the Gospel that God has placed in ministry with you and ponder how together God’s will be done in school year 1718. Enjoy your summer and our prayer is that as August arrives, you are refreshed and strengthened to continue service in God’s call for you.
 
Quality Education
Mark Muehl | June 22, 2017
Class Assignment Inspires Students to Help Homeless
What started out as a reading assignment at Lutheran South Unity School ended up inspiring a student-led service project helping the homeless in Fort Wayne. It’s an example of how academics go hand-in-hand with character education and generosity at LSUS, impacting both the students and the broader community. After seventh graders read the book The Watsons Go to Birmingham (1963), they were inspired to make a difference in their community while promoting tolerance among people groups. The students studied resources supplied by Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center and were encouraged to create class goals and brainstorm ways to assist those often devalued in the community. Their plan included crocheting portable mats from plastic yarn made from shopping bags to give to the homeless. Because the mats are made of plastic and easy to clean, they will be shared with those in need through the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission. Lutheran South Unity School serves an ethnically diverse group of students who are excited to give back to the local community. “We remind them, no matter how limited your resources, we can all help someone else,” says Maurice King, director of development. “You have the capacity to give of your time and talent.” Encouraged by their middle-school teacher, Mrs. Schwantz, the students organized a campaign to help the homeless. They started a letter-writing campaign, sending notes to local businesses requesting donated supplies such as crochet hooks, safety pins, scissors and plastic bags. Walmart donated gift cards. Volunteers taught students how to crochet plastic strips from shopping bags into 3x6 sleeping mats. “It started off as little project. Then Walmart called the second week of the project and decided to help,” Mrs. Schwantz said. “The project expanded and got bigger, involving more people. The goal was ten mats, but we’ll have fourteen completed.” The project continued to grow with hands-on learning. Sixth graders learned about economics by setting up and running simulations of cottage industries and factory production. LSUS students also taught older students from neighboring Bishop Luers High School how to make “plarn” (plastic-bag yarn) for their own service projects in Haiti. LSUS students partnered with organizations including the Franciscan Center and Bethlehem Food Bank by donating flattened grocery bags. Those agencies reciprocated by sending LSUS bags that had imperfections but were useful for the mat project. Beyond the impact the project will have on the homeless, it’s also teaching kids valuable lessons about working together and giving back to the community. “It did tremendous things for students on a personal level,” Schwantz added. That’s a lesson everyone can agree on.
 
Christian Leadership
Mark Muehl | June 22, 2017
Class Assignment Inspires Students to Help Homeless
What started out as a reading assignment at Lutheran South Unity School ended up inspiring a student-led service project helping the homeless in Fort Wayne. It’s an example of how academics go hand-in-hand with character education and generosity at LSUS, impacting both the students and the broader community. After seventh graders read the book The Watsons Go to Birmingham (1963), they were inspired to make a difference in their community while promoting tolerance among people groups. The students studied resources supplied by Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center and were encouraged to create class goals and brainstorm ways to assist those often devalued in the community. Their plan included crocheting portable mats from plastic yarn made from shopping bags to give to the homeless. Because the mats are made of plastic and easy to clean, they will be shared with those in need through the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission. Lutheran South Unity School serves an ethnically diverse group of students who are excited to give back to the local community. “We remind them, no matter how limited your resources, we can all help someone else,” says Maurice King, director of development. “You have the capacity to give of your time and talent.” Encouraged by their middle-school teacher, Mrs. Schwantz, the students organized a campaign to help the homeless. They started a letter-writing campaign, sending notes to local businesses requesting donated supplies such as crochet hooks, safety pins, scissors and plastic bags. Walmart donated gift cards. Volunteers taught students how to crochet plastic strips from shopping bags into 3x6 sleeping mats. “It started off as little project. Then Walmart called the second week of the project and decided to help,” Mrs. Schwantz said. “The project expanded and got bigger, involving more people. The goal was ten mats, but we’ll have fourteen completed.” The project continued to grow with hands-on learning. Sixth graders learned about economics by setting up and running simulations of cottage industries and factory production. LSUS students also taught older students from neighboring Bishop Luers High School how to make “plarn” (plastic-bag yarn) for their own service projects in Haiti. LSUS students partnered with organizations including the Franciscan Center and Bethlehem Food Bank by donating flattened grocery bags. Those agencies reciprocated by sending LSUS bags that had imperfections but were useful for the mat project. Beyond the impact the project will have on the homeless, it’s also teaching kids valuable lessons about working together and giving back to the community. “It did tremendous things for students on a personal level,” Schwantz added. That’s a lesson everyone can agree on.
 
Funding the Mission
Mark Muehl | May 15, 2017
Learn & Lead Series 2017
 
School Choice
Mark Muehl | March 20, 2017
Level the Playing Field by Protecting School Choice
Years ago, students from low-income families didn’t have much of a choice when it came to education. Some were stuck in poor-performing schools and unable to move to a better district. Non-public schools were out of the question, assumed only to be available to the affluent. Indiana’s Choice Scholarships ushered in a new era—one where all families, regardless of economic status, could choose the school they wanted, not the one they were forced into by circumstances. Opponents of school choice would have us overlook those needy families. They claim that expansions to Indiana’s choice scholarship have made it an “entitlement program for the wealthy.” However, data from the Department of Education simply doesn’t support their claim. The families benefiting most from the maximum Choice Scholarships are those who have the greatest need. Almost 69 percent of students who received the Choice Scholarship came from families whose annual income qualified them for the federal free or reduced lunch program. These are the students who received the maximum voucher amount—90 percent of the local public school’s per-student cost—and they are the clear majority of students who received vouchers. The remaining 31 percent are those who received a 50 percent scholarship. These are middle-income families whose annual income was equal to or less than 150 percent free or reduced lunch eligibility. When school-choice opponents say choice scholarship (vouchers) only benefit the elite, they are clearly ignoring the data. They also forget that the wealthy can already afford any school of their choice. Affluence gives them a freedom that low-income families did not have before choice scholarships. When Indiana voters gave low-income families the power of school choice, it leveled the playing field. It empowered all Hoosier families—regardless of wealth or ZIP code—an opportunity to choose the school that best fit their child’s needs. School choice should not just be for a privileged few. Indiana’s Choice Scholarship Program gives all Hoosier families the freedom to direct the education of their children, and that’s precisely how it should be.
 
SGO
Jon Dize | December 19, 2016
SGO Credits are Gone!
I hate to be the Scrooge-bearer of bad news, but the SGO credits are gone. Finished. We are out of coal for Bob Cratchit's office. For those wanting to support scholarships and receive the 50% state tax credit, you will have to wait until July 1, 2017 to make your gift. What does this mean? The Bah Humbugs: We received a number of donations late Friday, Saturday, and even Sunday (online credit/debit gifts). Since the Indiana Department of Revenue accepts SGO credit requests on a “first-come, first-get” basis, when they opened their emails this morning, they started down the list and many of these last-minute donations were too late. We will return checks and refund credit/debit card payments to these donors, strongly encouraging them to make their gift again in July. Per DOR rules, we cannot accept a gift and then hold the gift until July 1. (We hate returning gifts as much as Ebenezzer hated giving to charity.) If you have an autopay that sends us donations every month, you will need to suspend those payments until July 1. What is next? The Ghost of Christmas Futures: The Lutheran SGO of Indiana staff will continue to process non-credit gifts (matching gifts and gifts from donors not wanting the credit.) We still have two scholarship application due dates of January 15 and March 15. The 2016-17 fiscal year will be the 5th year of operations for our SGO, and we plan a few announcements to celebrate this milestone. We will be working with our School Choice partners to raise the credit amounts next and year and into the future, and may need your help convincing State House Scrooge's to free more credits for more scholarships; the more we raise, the more families we can help! We will still be available for questions (and answers!), donor presentations, etc. so keep calling and emailing. On the bright side, by going through $9.5 million in SGO credits, donors in Indiana have supported scholarships for families to attend non-public schools to the tune of $19 million. WOW. And, most of our schools raised the same or more than they did last year in less time than last year. We are therefore proud of our schools’ efforts to “get the word out” and start their fundraising efforts as early as the did. On behalf of the board of The Lutheran SGO of Indiana, Lynn, Jenny, and myself, we wish you a very merry Christmas and a happy, happy New Year. God bless us, every one!
 
News and Events
Mark Muehl | June 22, 2017
Class Assignment Inspires Students to Help Homeless
What started out as a reading assignment at Lutheran South Unity School ended up inspiring a student-led service project helping the homeless in Fort Wayne. It’s an example of how academics go hand-in-hand with character education and generosity at LSUS, impacting both the students and the broader community. After seventh graders read the book The Watsons Go to Birmingham (1963), they were inspired to make a difference in their community while promoting tolerance among people groups. The students studied resources supplied by Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center and were encouraged to create class goals and brainstorm ways to assist those often devalued in the community. Their plan included crocheting portable mats from plastic yarn made from shopping bags to give to the homeless. Because the mats are made of plastic and easy to clean, they will be shared with those in need through the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission. Lutheran South Unity School serves an ethnically diverse group of students who are excited to give back to the local community. “We remind them, no matter how limited your resources, we can all help someone else,” says Maurice King, director of development. “You have the capacity to give of your time and talent.” Encouraged by their middle-school teacher, Mrs. Schwantz, the students organized a campaign to help the homeless. They started a letter-writing campaign, sending notes to local businesses requesting donated supplies such as crochet hooks, safety pins, scissors and plastic bags. Walmart donated gift cards. Volunteers taught students how to crochet plastic strips from shopping bags into 3x6 sleeping mats. “It started off as little project. Then Walmart called the second week of the project and decided to help,” Mrs. Schwantz said. “The project expanded and got bigger, involving more people. The goal was ten mats, but we’ll have fourteen completed.” The project continued to grow with hands-on learning. Sixth graders learned about economics by setting up and running simulations of cottage industries and factory production. LSUS students also taught older students from neighboring Bishop Luers High School how to make “plarn” (plastic-bag yarn) for their own service projects in Haiti. LSUS students partnered with organizations including the Franciscan Center and Bethlehem Food Bank by donating flattened grocery bags. Those agencies reciprocated by sending LSUS bags that had imperfections but were useful for the mat project. Beyond the impact the project will have on the homeless, it’s also teaching kids valuable lessons about working together and giving back to the community. “It did tremendous things for students on a personal level,” Schwantz added. That’s a lesson everyone can agree on.
Emmaus
Emmanuel St. Michaels
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