Lutheran Curriculum in the Light of Christ and Psalm 8 (Part 3)

Psalm 8 continues to serve as inspiration for a discussion on curriculum. This last article is- The Man’s Role in Nature/Ecology (Part I, Part II)

Psalm 8:5,6- Yet you have made him a little lower than the heavenly beings and crowned him with glory and honor. You have given him dominion over the works of your hands; you have put all things under his feet.

Weather is fascinating. To consider wind patterns, the influence of elevations on vegetation, the ebb and flow of weather patterns and the impact of extreme environmental events, we can be awestruck. We can also be misdirected by the interpretation of these things and be led to guilt and misguided passions. End of church year pericopes remind us that God knows and is in control of all time, including the end times. Global warming or any environmental concerns are stewardship issues but not end of the world issues.

It’s important that as we teach ecology and care of the earth that we remember that humans were created by a loving God and given the responsibility to rule over, subdue, and care for the Creation. Man is not capable of controlling the earth. Control belongs to the Creator Himself (Psalm 24:1), who has made us His earthly stewards.

As one considers the minute position of earth in comparison of all the terrestrial bodies, we are wise to see the omnipotence of our God.

While Psalm 8 will direct our look at science and other subjects, Psalm 106 serves as a fitting way to express the depth of learning possible in science and other subjects. “Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever!” (Ps 106:1). Knowing and appreciating the depth of the Creator’s creation, we will share the abundance of His love. While creation and all that is Christ’s is learned, students (and teachers!) will no doubt grow in their relationship in Christ. The results will be found in faithful work and faithful relationships.

“Oh give thanks to the Lord for He IS good”….very good.